Rob Kivit Natuurfotografie - Birds & Wildlife Photography

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Photo Of The Day By Christopher Mills

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “The Calm Before The Storm” by Christopher Mills. Location: Littleton, Maine.

“A huge shelf cloud forms above the backroads of Littleton, Maine,” describes Mills. “As it went over, it was so still and quiet before we got hit with heavy rain and wind. It was really eerie.”

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Clayton Peoples

Photo By Clayton Peoples

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Stormy Sawtooths” by Clayton Peoples. Location: Sawtooth Wilderness, Idaho.

“We took a summer road trip that took us through Grand Teton, Yellowstone, Glacier, and the Sawtooth Mountains,” says Peoples. “In this particular image, storm clouds are billowing above the Sawtooth Range, reflected in a pond.”

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Stan Bysshe

Photo By Stan Bysshe

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Noisy Young Tern” by Stan Bysshe. Location: Long Island, New York.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Abstract Wildlife Assignment Winner Christopher Baker

Congratulations to Christopher Baker for winning the Abstract Wildlife Assignment with the image, “Peacock Patterns.” See more of Baker’s photography at cscottphoto.smugmug.com.

View the winning image and a selection of submissions in the gallery below. And be sure to check out our current photography assignment here and enter your best shots!

[See image gallery at www.outdoorphotographer.com]

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Photo Of The Day By Tom Elenbaas

Photo By Tom Elenbaas

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Disappearing Moon” by Tom Elenbaas. Location: Death Valley National Park, California.

“My brother and I made a trip to Death Valley in May to photograph the total lunar eclipse,” says Elenbaas. “Our original plan was to capture the entire arc of the moon from rise to set, but Mother Nature had other plans. A heavy cloud cover developed right after sunset, but we remained optimistic. The weather apps we were using predicted there would be a break in the clouds around 1 a.m., shortly before the start of the eclipse, and that’s exactly what happened. Although there were still heavy clouds all around, a window opened up right where the moon was traversing the night sky.”

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Harry Lichtman

Photo By Harry Lichtman

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Spring Bloom” by Harry Lichtman. Location: White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire.

“Watching the spring greens creep up the mountainsides in the White Mountains is much like watching fall foliage moving in the opposite direction,” explains Lichtman. “The mix of fresh and vibrant greens and yellows mixed with red buds can be quite striking. I used the alternating diagonals of this drainage with the backlit buds and foliage to create a quasi-abstract of this forest scene before the foliage became too thick to discern the tree trunks below. In this instance, strong contrast lighting worked best with a polarizer.”

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By garynack

Photo By garynack

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Cliff View” by garynack. Location: Big Timber, California.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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5 Tips To Master B&W Printing

Figure 1. The black-and-white print requires vision, technique and, more than anything else, practice.

Black-and-white printing is an art unto itself. There’s a lot to consider, both creatively and technically. Without color to lean on, we must put more thought into how we render our image’s textures, patterns and contrast. We might need to dodge and burn to direct the viewer’s attention either toward or away from certain parts of our composition. We want to know which paper or other medium will best express our vision. We must calibrate our monitors and consider the use of profiles.

Like with any craft, we practice and pay our dues through trial and error as we get familiar with what works and what doesn’t in order to master the black-and-white print. There’s no way around it; you can’t just read an article like this and walk away making perfect prints. I’ll do my best to make things easier, though, as I have a bit of experience printing for myself and for others.

For over 15 years now, I’ve been teaching digital workflow. In that time, I’ve grown to be a firm believer that printing is one of the most important—if not the most important—phases of a photographer’s workflow.

There are so many reasons why printing matters. I’ve witnessed that the photographers who regularly make prints look more critically through their bodies of work than the photographers who simply intend to post low-resolution versions of their images on social media. Photographers who print consider consistency in style and how images will exhibit together. They pay closer attention to how the details render, if sharpness is perfectly applied, if noise is distracting and if chromatic aberration needs to be removed (which can still be an issue for black-and-white imagery).

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Beyond The Portrait: Capture Behavior In Wildlife Photography

Making a good wildlife portrait is a challenge. Many factors must fall into place to create a successful image. The light can’t be harsh, ideally there’s a highlight in the subject’s eye, the background should be clean, the animal should be a good specimen, the head angle should show the eyes, if other subjects appear it’s best to avoid awkward mergers and many more factors. These alone make it difficult to piece together a good portrait let alone concentrating on behavior. But because the ultimate wildlife shot shows behavior, let’s cut to the chase and accept the challenge. Bring your work to the next level and capture behavior in wildlife photography by showing the animal in action.

The beauty of action is it can be captured in a few ways. It can be fluid and show lots of motion when a slow shutter speed is used or it can arrest the motion via the means of a high shutter speed. One shows implied motion and the other freezes it. Each has its own virtues and required means of capturing the effect. Both make stunning images when properly handled. In this week’s tip, I touch upon the basics of how to capture both aspects. Incorporate them into your photographic repertoire to make you a more diverse wildlife photographer.

Freeze It

To arrest the movement of fast-moving subjects, it requires fast shutter speeds dependent upon the action. The faster the movement, the higher the required speed to freeze the motion. For instance, an eagle in flight moves its wings at a much slower speed than a duck. A slower speed can be used to stop the action of an eagle’s primaries than a wood duck in flight. It’s essential to learn the rate of motion of the subjects you desire to capture. Additionally, the angle at which the subject moves dictates the shutter speed. If the subject moves toward or away from you, a slower one can be used than if the subject’s action is perpendicular.

Higher ISOs are necessary to attain the required shutter speeds to freeze the running, jumping, flying, leaping or other movement of any subject. It’s necessary to also use wide open apertures to acquire higher shutter speeds. As a lens is stopped down, the corresponding shutter speeds become increasingly slower. This behooves you to use fast lenses and apertures that are faster than ƒ/5.6 for example. To show action and/or behavior doesn’t require the animal to run, walk, fly or jump. Something as simple as a yawn, a bird preening, a mother licking its young to bathe it or an animal stalking prey are all aspects a photographer should strive for to elevate their wildlife photography. 

Motion Blur

Implied action is achieved via panning or creating an intentional blur. When panning, follow your subject as you make the exposure. The result is a sharp rendering of the moving object with a background that shows horizontal streaks. Intentional blur gives a painterly, impressionistic effect by using slow shutter speeds that record the motion of the subject. Panning produces a more predictable result, but it still requires you to develop the follow-through technique. Basically, start to follow your subject before you take the image and continue to follow it after pressing the shutter. The smoother the pan, the sharper the subject.

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Photo Of The Day By Hi il Lee

Photo By Hi il Lee

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sand Dunes Of Beauty” by Hi il Lee. Location: Colorado.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By David Connel

Photo By David Connel

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sunburst through the Keyhole” by David Connel. Location: Kodachrome Basin State Park, Utah.

“My wife and I spent a month exploring and photographing the canyons of Utah,” says Connel. “One of our stops was Kodachrome Basin State Park. We hiked every single trail in the park. One of those trails led to this particular arch. To obtain a unique perspective, I got down behind some boulders, placing them in the foreground and shot upward framing a rock pinnacle in the arch. The sunburst behind the pinnacle completes the image.”

1/25 sec., f/4, ISO 125, 19mm.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Bob Faucher

Photo By Bob Faucher

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Incomparable Vibrance” by Bob Faucher. Location: Near Moab, Utah.

“In the entire Colorado Plateau, you’d be hard-pressed to find a spot more vibrant than this one, Fisher Towers, at sunset, when the dark brown and purple walls become almost completely red,” says Faucher.

EF 200-400mm @ 200mm. Exposure: 1/20 sec., f/15, ISO 100.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Mark Koskulitz

Photo By Mark Koskulitz

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Devil’s Tower” by Mark Koskulitz. Location: Wyoming.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Mount Robson

Located approximately 435 miles northeast of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Mount Robson somehow manages to surpass all of the giddy expectations that a nine-hour drive can produce. On a clear day, the last stretch of the journey east on the Yellowhead Highway toward Mount Robson Provincial Park reveals the 12,972-foot peak of Mount Robson suddenly in a way that requires a moment for the brain to reconcile what the eyes see. While the area is remote and rugged, the roads are paved and well-maintained, providing easy summer access.

Weather At Mount Robson

Known to the Secwépemc people as Yexyexéscen, Robson claims superlatives as the tallest and most prominent peak in the Canadian Rockies. Its size and location allow it to readily capture atmospheric moisture moving east from the Pacific, giving Robson an elusive quality as it’s most often hiding behind cloud cover. As with all alpine regions, weather changes quickly and often dramatically. While this provides a dynamic, exciting experience for outdoor photographers, it’s best to keep your waterproof shell handy. The single biggest challenge a photographer will face here is weather.

Photo Experience

Robson’s well-lit snow cap and prominence above the dark valley creates a common challenge for landscape photographers. My short window of opportunity opened at sunset when the peak was quite bright and the trees I wanted to include in the foreground were quite dark. This was an opportunity to utilize every last bit of the 15-stop dynamic range in my Sony a7R III. The white snow was just on the edge of overexposure while the trees were almost black in the image preview. Trusting the camera’s histogram really paid off here.

The image was captured from the very accessible Mount Robson Provincial Park visitor’s center. Camera shake is always a concern, so I avoided the wood observation deck and relied on my camera’s onboard timer to trigger the image with the camera mounted on a tripod. The clouds were moving quickly, and I wanted to capture that movement, so I used a 10-stop neutral-density filter and a circular polarizer. This combination allowed a 110-second exposure at ƒ/20 and ISO 200. Given the tricky exposure and the fleeting nature of the light and clouds, 110 seconds felt like a very long time while I waited to see if my settings were correct.

Best Times To Visit Mount Robson

The area is most accessible from late May through October. As the peak of Mount Robson is so often shrouded in clouds, patience and a bit of luck go a long way. In my case, the peak was completely covered for all but about an hour of my multi-day visit, so it’s also best to keep those batteries charged. Conditions can change quickly in the mountains.

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View From The Top Assignment Winner James Day

Congratulations to James Day for winning the recent View From The Top Assignment with the image, “Looking Down from Mont Blanc.” See more of Day’s work at www.jdaypix.com.

View the winning image and a selection of submissions in the gallery below. And be sure to check out our current photography assignment here and enter your best shots!

[See image gallery at www.outdoorphotographer.com]

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Photo Of The Day By Laura Schoenbauer

Photo By Laura Schoenbauer

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Badlands View” by Laura Schoenbauer. Location: Wall, South Dakota.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Wildlife In Black & White

This image of a bear silhouetted in front of a waterfall captures what I felt witnessing the scene—the stillness of the bear against the rushing movement of the water.

I remember the fixer smell I couldn’t get off my hands, seeing my image emerge on paper for the first time as it sat in the developer. I was the darkroom manager at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where I was studying to be an electrical engineer—and slowly falling more and more in love with photography.

I remember spending hours manually dodging and burning my prints with tools made from cardboard, coat hangers and strings. I learned and drew my inspiration from masters like Ansel Adams and Jerry Uelsmann. These artists had ways of leading your eyes through the frame by darkening certain areas and lightening others. They could take you on a journey, leading you down into a scene as if you were walking the path yourself or taking you into their endless artistic imagination.

Photographed at La Senda Verde in Bolivia, a spider monkey hangs from a tree at a sanctuary on the outskirts of the Amazon. Including your subject’s surroundings can help elevate your image by adding the location to the story.

Their photographs, as well as the work of other black-and-white masters like Mary Ellen Mark, Gordon Parks, Irving Penn, Sebastiao Salgado, Edward Weston and others, took me to places, shared stories, revealed the extraordinary in everyday objects, introduced me to strangers, shared passions and exposed injustices. They showed me life. I was hooked, and after three years on a full scholarship in engineering, I left and moved to Australia, where I pursued a fine arts degree with a concentration in photo media.

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Photo Of The Day By Laura Zirino

Photo By Laura Zirino

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “First Hint of Light” by Laura Zirino. Location: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

“Light breaks through clouds at dawn, seen from Yavapai Point,” describes Zirino.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Prajkta Panchmukh

Photo By Prajkta Panchmukh

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Fly Line” by Prajkta Panchmukh. Location: Pune, India.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Robert Henderson

Photo By Robert Henderson

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Spotted Doves Spotted Leaving” by Robert Henderson. Location: Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania.

“The two emerald-spotted doves have had enough of the aggressive pair of pied kingfishers who wanted the branch all to themselves,” explains Henderson. “The primary feature normally used to identify emerald-spotted wood doves are the iridescent green spots on their wings. The warm rufous undersides of their wings are beautiful as well.”

Canon 7D Mark II, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II USM lens with 1.4X III teleconverter. Exposure: 1/3200 sec., f/8, ISO 500, 560mm.

Want to get your images in the running for a Photo of the Day feature? Photo of the Day is chosen from various galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the website homepage, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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